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Welcome to the Center for Cardiovascular Research (CCR)

The Center for Cardiovascular Research (CCR) is an institution specialized in cardiovascular research at the CharitéUniversitätsmedizin Berlin. It is mainly located at Campus Charité Mitte. It was founded as an experimental research center of the Charité. Two cardiology clinics, the Nephrology Clinic, the Endocrinology Clinic, the Institute of Pharmacology and the Institute of Gender in Medicine (GiM) are working together in an interdisciplinary manner.

 

With this Center, the Faculty promotes cardiovascular and metabolic research at the Charité. It provides excellent conditions for cooperative research in the areas of heart failure and myocardial hypertrophy, vascular disorders, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Further research focuses on gender-specific differences in cardiovascular disease as well as in molecular pharmacology. The CCR combines cardiology, numerous medical specialties, including nephrology, endocrinology and pharmacology. Scientists in 15 research groups are investigating the causes of particularly frequent cardiac and circulatory diseases. In parallel, they are developing innovative therapeutic possibilities.

 

The CCR comprises also an animal facility area which is supported by the experimental research facilities (FEM) for experimental breeding. The CCR animal facility is equipped with several units for metabolic and cardiovascular phenotyping of small animals. Among other things, a preclinical echocardiography device, metabolic cages and implantable telemetry transponders are available.

 

The CCR works in close collaboration with the German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). Membership in the DZHK also confirms the high quality of cardiovascular research. At the DZHK, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research is funding 28 institutions at 7 locations in Germany, which were selected in a competitive process. In the DZHK, patient-oriented interdisciplinary research is carried out in networks of leading scientists.